Education

  • CPhil Ancient Near Eastern Studies — UCLA
  • MA Ancient Near Eastern Studies — UCLA
  • MA Egyptology — University of Memphis
  • BA Classics — Duke University

Research

Dissertation: Hittite Queenship: Women and Power in Hittite Anatolia

Though scholars have long acknowledged the prominence of royal women in the Late Bronze Age, the power and agency of queens remain understudied. Hittite queens participated in the negotiation of treaties and diplomatic marriages, appointed members of the extended royal family to positions in the military and government, participated in networks of economic exchange and patronage through owning, leasing, and distributing livestock, captives, and prestige goods, and sponsored state festivals that created and reinforced social stratification. This dissertation examines how queens were able to utilize their roles as wives, mothers, and priestesses to amass significant political, economic, and ideological power within a male-dominated society.

Honors & Awards

2017-2018 Dissertation Year Fellowship, UCLA
2016-2017 Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAANN) fellowship in Middle Eastern studies

Courses

Instructor

  • Ancient Egyptian Art I
  • Ancient Egyptian Religion

Teaching Assistant

  • Ancient Egyptian Civilization I
  • Ancient Egyptian Civilization II
  • Ancient Egyptian Religion
  • Cinema and the Ancient World
  • Classical Mythology
  • Jerusalem: the Holy City
  • US History to 1877
  • US History since 1877
  • Visible Language: Study of Writing

Recent Talks

“Festivals and social hierarchies in Hittite Anatolia.” Oxford Postgraduate Conference in Assyriology. April 21, 2017.

“Puduhepa, power, and politics in the Hittite royal court.” Annual Meeting of the American Oriental Society. March 19, 2017.