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March 2020

Armenian Mythology

March 10 @ 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
365 Kaplan Hall,

  All welcome Pizza and refreshments will be served All proceedings will be in Armenian   Hrach Martirosyan is currently Lecturer in Eastern Armenian in the department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures at UCLA. After receiving his MA in Philology from Vanadzor Pedagogical Institute, he pursued graduate studies under the supervision of Prof. Sargis Harutyunyan at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography of the Armenian Academy of Sciences in Yerevan. His dissertation “Etymological Dictionary of the Armenian Inherited Lexicon”…

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‘I Founded therein a Palace of Cedar’: Constructing and Manipulating Distant Lands in the Ancient Near East

March 10 @ 1:45 pm - 3:30 pm
243 Royce Hall,

Borders, frontiers, and the lands that lay beyond them were created and defined through a variety of physical, geographical, and moreover, social and cultural means in Mesopotamia. This talk centers on the ways in which one such distant land, the Cedar Forest (tir eren orqišti erēni) was construed in Sumerian and Akkadian textual sources, as well as in artistic representations, throughout the second and first millennia BCE. The image of the Cedar Forest finds its foundations in Old Babylonian literary…

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People of Empire: Assyrianness Through the Looking-Glass of the Neo-Assyrian State

March 5 @ 1:45 pm - 3:30 pm

In the first half of the first millennium BCE, the Neo-Assyrian state forged what Mario Liverani has called the world's "prototype empire". Empires are often associated with imperial peoples: a core population that maintains its distinctiveness and enjoys a privileged position within the imperial structure. Were the Assyrians such a people? The Neo-Assyrian state apparatus produced a great deal of textual material spanning many genres and purposes and covering much of its existence. A significant part of this material has…

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Translating Daniel Varuzhan’s Pagan Songs

March 3 @ 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm
Kaplan Hall 311,

"Daniel Varoujan’s Pagan Songs shocked readers when it was published in 1912. Russian Armenian critics condemned its frank descriptions of eroticism as pornographic and disapproved of its poetic paganism as a symptom of the "nationlist disease". For its unsympathetic view of Christianity and its glorification of the pagan era, the Armenian church considered it criminally anti-Christian, while feminists claimed Varoujan objectified women by depicting them as “being created for the sexual gratification of men”. On the occasion of the first…

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Biennial Ehsan Yarshater Lecture Series

March 2 - March 11
Fowler A222, 308 Charles E Young Dr N
Los Angeles, CA 90024 United States
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The Ehsan Yarshater Lecture Series presentations at UCLA, which has a counterpart at the Collège de France, are delivered by a distinguished scholar whose work has impacted the study of the Iranian Civilization. Each biennial lecture series consists of four to five lectures on a single theme that is elaborated and amplified into a monograph. The 2020 Biennial Ehsan Yarshater Lecture Series honored guest lecturer is Professor Daniel Potts. The 2020 Yarshater Lecture Series will be held in the Cotsen…

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February 2020

Creating the Cult of a Goddess: Politics and Religion at Mari in the Old Babylonian Period

February 27 @ 1:45 pm - 3:15 pm
Fowler A222, 308 Charles E Young Dr N
Los Angeles, CA 90024 United States
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Traces of ancient Mesopotamian religion have been discovered by archaeologists working across the modern Middle East—temples and other religious structures, worn by time; small fragments of once-opulent cult statues and temple furnishings; clay tablets inscribed with stories of and hymns to the gods; and mundane records of administrators, concerned with tracking the many cults that could inhabit a single city. While the Assyriologist A. Leo Oppenheim cautioned that these remains were capable of revealing “only a dim reflection” of Mesopotamian…

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Armenian Dialects

February 25 @ 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
305 Kaplan Hall,

  All welcome Pizza and refreshments will be served All proceedings will be in Armenian   Hrach Martirosyan is currently Lecturer in Eastern Armenian in the department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures at UCLA. After receiving his MA in Philology from Vanadzor Pedagogical Institute, he pursued graduate studies under the supervision of Prof. Sargis Harutyunyan at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography of the Armenian Academy of Sciences in Yerevan. His dissertation “Etymological Dictionary of the Armenian Inherited Lexicon”…

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From Enoch to Daniel: Reimagining the Past in the Aramaic Dead Sea Scrolls

February 25 @ 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
314 Royce Hall,

Sponsored by The UCLA Alan D. Leve Center for Jewish Studies Cosponsored by The Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures Since the late 1940s, the approximately 1,000 manuscripts discovered in caves alongside the Dead Sea – popularly called the Dead Sea Scrolls – have been reshaping in significant ways study of the Bible and ancient Judaism. Often left out of discussions about the scrolls are the approximately 30 Jewish literary works written in Aramaic. This talk will introduce the…

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New Insights into the Inscribed Landscape of the Wadi Hammamat Quarries

February 24 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
243 Royce Hall,

Located halfway between the Nile and the shores of the Red Sea, the Wadi Hammamat is the modern name of ancient greywacke and siltstone quarries in the Eastern Desert (Egypt), exploited from the Predynastic period onwards. Known to us since the time of its first explorers, namely K. R. Lepsius and J. Burton (19th century), the Wadi Hammamat quarries were explored by many epigraphic and archaeological survey teams throughout the last century. After Dr. Annie Gasse’s survey in the 1980’s—which…

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Pourdavoud Center: 14th Melammu Symposium

February 18 - February 20
314 Royce Hall,

“Contextualizing Iranian Religions in the Ancient World” Please click here to view the full symposium schedule. The 14th Melammu Symposium: Contextualizing Iranian Religions in the Ancient World The Pourdavoud Center for the Study of the Iranian World is convening the 14th Melammu Symposium at UCLA. The international three-day symposium held at Royce Hall will explore Iranian religions in light of ancient Near Eastern traditions and precedents. It hosts scholars whose work pertain to the interchange of ideas and practices between…

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