Courses

  • For information about specific section times and locations  please view the UCLA Schedule of Classes.
  • For a complete listing of department courses visit the UCLA General Catalog.

Spring 2017

AN E EA 19 – Ancient Warfare and Modern Concerns

Instructor: Aaron A. Burke

Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

Today it is nearly universal fact that citizens of democracies rely entirely on professional armies to meet their security needs. While such reliance has freed citizens of mandatory conscription concerns, it has not freed them of need to understand reasons for conflicts, costs of war, planning for war, and assessing validity of conflicts. Raises key issues about study of warfare in ancient world as avenue for consideration of issues relevant to citizens of modern states. Value of such study is that we are more capable of approaching it with greater detachment and considering issues involved from intellectual, rather than emotional or necessarily ideological, standpoint. Through series of short readings, students engage causes, effects, and development of warfare in ancient Near East over two millennia (circa 2500 BC to AD 400) and evaluate extent to which factors and principles involved have changed.

AN N EA 10W – Jerusalem: Holy City

Instructor: Ramos, M.

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 12W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architecture, and iconography in relation to written word. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

AN N EA 12W – Jerusalem: Holy City

Instructor: Jeremy Smoak

Seminar, four hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 10W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architectural monuments, and iconography in relation to written sources. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Development of advanced writing skills and critical thinking. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

AN N EA 220 – Seminar: Ancient Egypt

Instructor: Kathlyn (Kara) Cooney, Troche, J.

Seminar, three hours. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

AN N EA C277 – Variable Topics in Ancient Near East

Instructor: Kathlyn (Kara) Cooney

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Variable topics; consult “Schedule of Classes” for topics to be offered in specific term. Concurrently scheduled with course CM177. S/U or letter grading.

AN N EA CM163 – Archaeology of Iran

Instructor: Ali Mousavi

(Formerly numbered C163.) (Same as Iranian CM163.) Lecture, three hours. Designed to introduce students to Iranian archaeology from prehistoric through Achaemenid times. Concurrently scheduled with course CM259. P/NP or letter grading.

AN N EA CM259 – Archaeology of Iran

Instructor: Ali Mousavi

(Formerly numbered C259.) (Same as Iranian CM259.) Lecture, three hours. Designed to introduce students to Iranian archaeology from prehistoric through Achaemenid times. Concurrently scheduled with course CM163. S/U or letter grading.

AN N EA M104D – Assyrians

Instructor: Elizabeth Carter

(Same as History M104D.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Overview of Assyrian cultural history from its origins to end of Neo-Assyrian period (circa 612 B.C.E.), with focus on rise, mechanics, and decline of Neo-Assyrian Empire, which at its peak ruled ancient Near East from Zagros to Egypt. P/NP or letter grading.

AN N EA M130/ Religion M132 – Ancient Egyptian Religion

Instructor: Julia Troche

(Same as Religion M132.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to religious beliefs, practices, and sentiments of ancient Egypt to study Egyptian religion as coherent system of thought and sphere of action that once served as meaningful and relevant framework for understanding physical reality and human life for inhabitants of Nile Valley. General principles as well as developments through time (circa 3000 B.C. to 300 C.E.). Topics include mythology, temple and cult, magic, and personal piety. P/NP or letter grading.

AN N EA M135 – Religion in Ancient Israel

Instructor: Jeremy Smoak

(Same as Religion M135.) Lecture, three hours. Introductory survey of various ancient Israelite religious beliefs and practices, their origin, and development, with special attention to diversity of religious practice in ancient Israel and Canaan during 1st millennium B.C.E. P/NP or letter grading.

Arabic 102C.1 – Intermediate Standard Arabic

Instructor: Abeer Hamza (Mohamed)

Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 102B. Not open to students who have learned, from whatever source, enough Arabic to qualify for more advanced courses. Intermediate formal Arabic, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. P/NP or letter grading.

Arabic 102C.2 – Intermediate Standard Arabic

Instructor: Abeer Hamza (Mohamed)

Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 102B. Not open to students who have learned, from whatever source, enough Arabic to qualify for more advanced courses. Intermediate formal Arabic, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. P/NP or letter grading.

Arabic 103C – Advanced Arabic

Instructor: Abeer Hamza (Mohamed)

Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 102A, 102B, 102C. Not open to students who have learned, from whatever source, enough Arabic to qualify for more advanced courses. Advanced formal Arabic, including grammar, composition, and readings from classical and modern texts. P/NP or letter grading.

Arabic 120 – Islamic Texts

Instructor: Behnam Sadeghi

Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 103C. Readings from Qur’an, Tafsir, Hadith, Fiqh. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

Arabic 1C. 4 – Elementary Standard Arabic

Instructor: Azza Ahmad

Lecture, six hours. Enforced requisite: course 1B. Not open to students with prior knowledge of Arabic. Introduction to formal Arabic (modern standard Arabic), including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. P/NP or letter grading.

Arabic 1C.1 – Elementary Standard Arabic

Instructor: Azza Ahmad

Lecture, six hours. Enforced requisite: course 1B. Not open to students with prior knowledge of Arabic. Introduction to formal Arabic (modern standard Arabic), including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. P/NP or letter grading.

Arabic 1C.2 – Elementary Standard Arabic

Instructor: Azza Ahmad

Lecture, six hours. Enforced requisite: course 1B. Not open to students with prior knowledge of Arabic. Introduction to formal Arabic (modern standard Arabic), including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. P/NP or letter grading.

Arabic 1C.3 – Elementary Standard Arabic

Instructor: Azza Ahmad

Lecture, six hours. Enforced requisite: course 1B. Not open to students with prior knowledge of Arabic. Introduction to formal Arabic (modern standard Arabic), including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. P/NP or letter grading.

Arabic 220 – Seminar: Islamic Texts

Instructor: Asma Sayeed

Seminar, three hours. Major Islamic thinkers and their works from classical period to modern times. Coverage of doctrines and hermeneutics of various schools of thought in Islam, such as Ahl al-sunna wa’l-jama’a, Shi’a, Mu’tazila, and Sufis. May be organized around one author and his works, multiple authors and their works, or specific topic with representative readings from various schools. Exploration of secondary literature in Arabic and other languages for student research papers. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

Arabic M151 – Modern Arabic Literature in English

Instructor: The Staff

(Same as Comparative Literature M167.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for upper division literature majors. Topics may include constructions of otherness in modern Arab culture; East-West debate; memory, trauma, and mourning; violence, narrative, and ethics; globalization, oil, and cultural insurgency; Arab culture in transnational context or questions of reception, exoticism, translation, and marketing. Genres may include prison narratives; novel of terror; memoirs by women and/or by refugees and exiles; 19th- and 20th-century travel narratives; Arabic romantic poetry; literature of pre-1948; rise of Arab novel. Areas may range from generic look at Arab world to narrow focus on Maghreb or one country such as Algeria, Palestine, Iraq, Lebanon, or Egypt. May also be organized around Arab literatures written in one specific language, namely English, Arabic, or French. Letter grading.

Armenian 101C – Elementary Modern Western Armenian

Instructor: Hagop Kouloujian

(Formerly numbered 1C.) Lecture, five hours. Recommended requisite: course 101B. Students with knowledge of Armenian should contact instructor to determine appropriate enrollment level. Armenian grammar, conversation, and exercises. P/NP or letter grading.

Armenian 102C – Intermediate Modern Western Armenian

Instructor: Hagop Kouloujian

Lecture, five hours. Recommended requisite: course 1C. Students with knowledge of Eastern or Western Armenian (from elementary or high school) should contact instructor to determine appropriate enrollment level. Reading of selected texts, composition, and conversation. May be taken independently for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

Armenian 104C – Elementary Modern Eastern Armenian

Instructor: Shushan Karapetian

(Formerly numbered 4C.) Lecture, five hours. Recommended requisite: course 104B. Students with knowledge of Western Armenian should contact instructor to determine appropriate enrollment level. Designed for students with little or no prior knowledge of Eastern Armenian, official idiom of Republic of Armenia. Introduction to basics of grammar and conversation. P/NP or letter grading.

Armenian 105C – Intermediate Modern Eastern Armenian

Instructor: Anahid Keshishian

Lecture, five hours. Recommended requisite: course 4C. Students with knowledge of Eastern or Western Armenian (from elementary or high school) should contact instructor to determine appropriate enrollment level. Continuing introduction to Armenian grammar, with greater attention to readings from short stories and simple newspaper articles and film viewing on video. Emphasis on improving students’ self expression in idiom, both orally and in written form. May be taken independently for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

Armenian 106C – Advanced Modern Eastern Armenian

Instructor: Shushan Karapetian

Lecture, four hours. Recommended requisite: course 105C. Students with knowledge of Eastern or Western Armenian (from elementary or high school) should contact instructor to determine appropriate enrollment level. Designed for students with advanced speaking fluency and reading abilities in Armenian. Discussion of contemporary Armenian social and cultural issues through readings from critical essays, editorials, short stories, and poems written since World War II and film showings. Emphasis on enhancing students’ self expression orally and in written form. Each course may be taken independently for credit. Letter grading.

Armenian 120 – Language in Diaspora: Armenian as a Heritage Language

Instructor: Shushan Karapetian

Lecture, three hours. Comprehensive examination of status of Armenian as heritage language in diasporic context. Introduction to diaspora, particularly in Armenian context, and to heritage languages and heritage learners. Review of development of modern standards of Armenian (Eastern and Western) and special circumstances for each variety in order to position Armenian on sociolinguistic map of heritage languages. Exploration of issues such as linguistic features of heritage speakers, patterns and domains of language use, psychological restraints (i.e., anxiety, fear, etc.) connected with speaking heritage languages, language attitudes with ideologies, and role of language in Armenian identity construction. P/NP or letter grading.

Armenian 231C – Intermediate Classical Armenian

Instructor: S. Peter Cowe

Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 230C. Intensive review of grammar and reading of select prose and poetic texts. May be taken independently for credit. Letter grading.

Armenian C153: Art, Politics, and Nationalism in Armenian Literature

Instructor: S. Peter Cowe

Lecture, four hours. Examination of role of literature in modern Armenian society in service to cause or causes, as propaganda for various ideologies, as art for art’s sake, etc. Exploration of contrasting aesthetics implicit in these differing interpretations. Concurrently scheduled with course C253. P/NP or letter grading.

Hebrew 102C – Intermediate Hebrew

Instructor: Nancy Ezer

Lecture, five hours. Enforced requisite: course 102B or Hebrew placement test. Not open to native speakers. Amplification of grammar; reading of texts from modern literature. P/NP or letter grading.

Hebrew 103C – Advanced Hebrew

Instructor: Lev Hakak

Lecture, five hours. Enforced requisites: courses 102A, 102B, and 102C, or Hebrew placement test. Students with prior knowledge of Hebrew who did not take courses 102A, 102B, and 102C should contact instructor to determine appropriate enrollment level. Not open to native speakers. Designed for students with intermediate speaking fluency and reading abilities in Hebrew. Introduction to modern Hebrew literary texts. P/NP or letter grading.

Hebrew 188FL – Special Studies: Readings in Hebrew

Instructor: Jeremy Smoak

Seminar, two hours. Requisite: course 102C. Students must be concurrently enrolled in an affiliated main course. Primary readings and advanced training in Hebrew. Additional work in Hebrew to enrich and augment work assigned in main course, including reading, writing, and other exercises in Hebrew. P/NP or letter grading.

Hebrew 1C.1 – Elementary Hebrew

Instructor: Nancy Ezer

Lecture, four hours; laboratory, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 1B or Hebrew placement test. Not open to native speakers. Introduction to modern Hebrew, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. P/NP or letter grading.

Hebrew 1C.2 – Elementary Hebrew

Instructor: Nancy Ezer

Lecture, four hours; laboratory, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 1B or Hebrew placement test. Not open to native speakers. Introduction to modern Hebrew, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. P/NP or letter grading.

Hebrew 220 – Studies in Hebrew Bible Literature

Instructor: William Schniedewind

Seminar, three hours. Critical study of Hebrew texts in relation to major versions; philological, comparative, literary, and historical study of various biblical books. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

Hebrew 240 – Modern Poetry & Prose

Instructor: Lev Hakak

Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 103A, 103B, and 103C, or equivalent knowledge of Hebrew. Study of major Hebrew writers of past 100 years. May be repeated for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C240. Letter grading.

Hebrew C140 – Modern Hebrew Poetry & Prose

Instructor: Lev Hakak

Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 103A, 103B, and 103C, or equivalent knowledge of Hebrew. Study of major Hebrew writers of past 100 years. May be repeated for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C240. Letter grading.

Iranian 102C – Intermediate Persian

Instructor: Latifeh Hagigi

Lecture, six hours. Requisite: course 102B. P/NP or letter grading.

Iranian 103C – Advanced Persian (Modern Persian Poetry & Prose)

Instructor: Ahmad Karimi-Hakkak

Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 102C. Students who do exceptionally well in course 20C may be permitted to enroll with consent of instructor. May be taken independently for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

Iranian 131 – Into to Judeo-Persian: Literature and Culture

Instructor: Nahid Pirnazar

Lecture, three hours. Preparation: knowledge of Persian equivalent to course 102C. Introduction to history of Judeo-Persian literature and culture to prepare students to read Judeo-Persian texts. P/NP or letter grading.

Iranian 150A – Survey of Persian Literature in English

Instructor: Ahmad Karimi-Hakkak

Lecture, three hours. Knowledge of Persian not required. May be taken independently for credit.

Iranian 1C – Elementary Persian

Instructor: Banafsheh Pourzangiabadi, Shayegan, M.

Lecture, six hours. Enforced requisite: course 1B. Not open to students with prior knowledge of Persian. P/NP or letter grading.

Iranian 20C – Accelerated Elementary Persian

Instructor: Latifeh Hagigi

Lecture, four hours; discussion two hours; laboratory, 30 minutes per day. Preparation: some knowledge of spoken Persian. Enforced requisite: course 20B. Intensive and thorough study of fundamental structure of Persian grammar; reading from a wide range of classical and modern poetry and prose compositions. P/NP or letter grading.

Iranian 220B – Classical Persian Texts

Instructor: Domenico Ingenito

Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 103A, 103B, 103C. Study of selected classical Persian texts. May be taken independently for credit.

Iranian 251 – Seminar: Contemporary Persian Literature

Instructor: Ahmad Karimi-Hakkak

Seminar, three hours. Requisite: course 140. Studies in specific problems and trends in Persian poetry and prose in the 20th century. May be repeated twice for credit.

Iranian CM163 – Archaeology of Iran

Instructor: Ali Mousavi

(Same as Ancient Near East CM163.) Lecture, three hours. Designed to introduce students to Iranian archaeology from prehistoric through Achaemenid times. Concurrently scheduled with course CM259. P/NP or letter grading.

Iranian CM259 – Archaeology of Iran

Instructor: Ali Mousavi

(Same as Ancient Near East CM259.) Lecture, three hours. Designed to introduce students to Iranian archaeology from prehistoric through Achaemenid times. Concurrently scheduled with course CM163. S/U or letter grading.

Iranian M105C – Baha’i Faith in Iran: 20th-Century Ian and Baha’is

Instructor: Nader Saiedi

Same as Religion M105C.) Lecture, three hours. Readings in English. Role of Baha’is in fabric of Persian society as agents of modern education and communal service. May be taken independently for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

Iranian M110C – Iranian Civilization

Instructor: TBD

(Same as Ancient Near East M110C and History M110C.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). History of ancient Iran from rise of Elam to end of Sasanian dynasty — Elamite civilization and Mede, Achaemenid, Arsacid, and Sasanian Empires. Emphasis on ancient Iran, but may be offered for early Islamic period. P/NP or letter grading.

Islamic 291.2 – Variable Topics in Islamic Studies

Instructor: Asma Sayeed

Seminar, three hours. Selected topics on Islam. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

Islamic 291A.1 – Variable Topics in Islamic Studies

Instructor: Behnam Sadeghi

Seminar, three hours. Selected topics on Islam. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

Islamic M112 – Archeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt

Instructor: Katherine S. Burke

(Same as Archaeology M112, Art History M119D, and Middle Eastern Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century C.E. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading.

Jewish 170 – Dead Sea Scrolls and Early Judaism

Instructor: William Schniedewind

Lecture, three hours. Introduction to Dead Sea Scrolls in English translation. Survey of literature, community of Khirbet Qumran, and their place in early Judaism. P/NP or letter grading.

Jewish 177 – Variable Topics in Jewish Studies

Instructor: Anat Gilboa

Lecture, three hours. Variable topics; consult “Schedule of Classes” for topics to be offered in specific term. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

Jewish M142 – Modern Israel: Politics, Society, Culture

Instructor: TBD

(Formerly numbered 142.) (Same as Middle Eastern Studies M142.) Lecture, three hours. Examination of evolution of Israel — its changing society, volatile domestic and foreign politics, and dynamic culture — from its foundation in 1948 to present, in context of global political and cultural change and changing Jewish world. Tension between Israel’s conception of itself as Jewish state and fact that it is home to wide variety of ethnic and religious groups and to great diversity of cultures; that it was envisaged as safe haven for Jewish people but has been characterized by insecurity and ongoing war; that, founded as democracy, it contends with multiple strains on its democratic system, such as tensions between Jews and Arabs, secular and religious Jews, and disparate ethnic groups. P/NP or letter grading.

M E STD 50C – Modern Middle East

Instructor: Simona Livescu

(Formerly numbered Near Eastern Languages 50C.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of modern Middle Eastern cultures through readings and films from Middle East and North Africa. Letter grading.

M E STD M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt

Instructor: Katherine S. Burke

(Same as Archaeology M112, Art History M119D, and Islamic Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century C.E. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading.

M E STD M142 – Modern Israel: Politics, Society, Culture

Instructor: Nadav Molchadsky

(Same as Jewish Studies M142.) Lecture, three hours. Examination of evolution of Israel — its changing society, volatile domestic and foreign politics, and dynamic culture — from its foundation in 1948 to present, in context of global political and cultural change and changing Jewish world. Tension between Israel’s conception of itself as Jewish state and fact that it is home to wide variety of ethnic and religious groups and to great diversity of cultures; that it was envisaged as safe haven for Jewish people but has been characterized by insecurity and ongoing war; that, founded as democracy, it contends with multiple strains on its democratic system, such as tensions between Jews and Arabs, secular and religious Jews, and disparate ethnic groups. P/NP or letter grading.

NR EAST M20 – Visible Language: Study of Writing

Instructor: Jeremy Smoak

(Same as Asian M20, Indo-European Studies M20, Slavic M20, and Southeast Asian M20.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Consideration of concrete means of language representation in writing systems. Earliest representations of language known are those of Near East dating to end of 4th millennium B.C. While literate civilizations of Egypt, Indus Valley, China, and Mesoamerica left little evidence of corresponding earliest developments, their antiquity and, in case of China and Mesoamerica, their evident isolation mark these centers as loci of independent developments in writing. Basic characteristics of early scripts, assessment of modern alphabetic writing systems, and presentation of conceptual basis of semiotic language representation. Origins and development of early non-Western writing systems. How Greco-Roman alphabet arose in 1st millennium B.C. and how it compares to other modern writing systems. P/NP or letter grading.

Semitic 240 – Seminar: Akkadian Language

Instructor: Barbara Cifola

Seminar, two hours. Readings of texts from various dialects of Akkadian; selected problems in linguistic analysis of Akkadian dialects. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

Turkic 101C – Elementary Turkish

Instructor: Beyza Lorenz

Lecture, five hours. Requisite: course 101B. Grammar, reading, conversation, and elementary composition drills. P/NP or letter grading.

Turkic 102C – Advanced Turkish

Instructor: Beyza Lorenz

Lecture, five hours. Requisites: courses 101A, 101B, 101C. Continuing study of grammar, conversation, and composition. Readings in modern literature and social science texts. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.