Courses

  • For information about specific section times and locations  please view the UCLA Schedule of Classes.
  • For a complete listing of department courses visit the UCLA General Catalog.

Winter 2022

  • AN N EA 12W - Jerusalem: Holy City

    Instructor(s): Jeremy Smoak

    Seminar, four hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 10W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architectural monuments, and iconography in relation to written sources. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Development of advanced writing skills and critical thinking. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

  • AN N EA 15W - Women and Power in Ancient World

    Instructor(s): Nora BairamianBryan ElliffMadison GatesStephen WardLori PirinjianMaryan RaghebDavid BrownJordan GalczynskiKathlyn CooneyMatei TichindeleanAaron SamuelsAaron Cash

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 15. Examination of how feminine power confronts masculine dominance within complex social systems in ancient world. To gain political power, some female rulers used their sexuality to gain access to important men. Other women gained their position as regents and helpers of masculine kings who were too young to rule. Others denied their femininity in dress and manner, effectively androgynizing themselves or pretending to be men so that their femininity would not be obstacle to political rule. Many women only gained throne at end of dynasties after male line had run out entirely, or in midst of civil war when patrilineal successions were in disarray. No women were able to gain reigns of power through their bloodlines alone. Women's power was compromised from outset. Examination of root causes and results of this political inequality. Satisfies Writing II req

  • AN N EA 162 - Archaeology, Identity, and Bible

    Instructor(s): Emilie NordhuesSarah HarringtonAaron Burke

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction of archaeological record of southern Levant (ancient Israel) from Bronze Age through Achaemenid Period (ca. 2500-332 BC) in combination with current understandings of genre, authorship, and historical value of Hebrew Bible. Ancient Israelite identities are traced through combination of archaeological and textual sources. Social, religious, and political traditions of ancient Israel and Judah are interpreted in context of both earlier Bronze Age traditions and Israel's Iron Age neighbors. Archaeological and textual data for identities, such as Amorites, Canaanites, Phoenicians, Egyptians, Assyrians, and Babylonians, form basis for evaluating construction and maintenance of various biblical identities. Introduction to theoretical and methodological issues involving historical archaeology of ancient Israel and Levant, and possibilities for investigating negotiation of identity in archaeological record. P/NP or letter grading.

  • AN N EA C165 - Egyptian Archaeology

    Instructor(s): Willemina Wendrich

    Seminar, three hours. Opportunity to research aspects of topics in ancient Egyptian archaeology. Topics vary each year. May be repeated for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C266. P/NP or letter grading.

  • AN N EA M60W - Achaemenid Civilization and Empire of Alexander

    Instructor(s): Crystal MelaraElisabeth KochElizabeth VandykeEmma PetersenJeffrey NewmanM ShayeganHong Yu Chen

    (Same as History M60W and Iranian M60W.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course M60. Survey of period from circa 600 to 300 BCE, rise and fall of Achaemenid Persia, first world empire of antiquity, which was ended by Alexander the Great, whose campaigns were as transformative as they were violent. Alexander connected ancient Mediterranean and Near East as never before, ushering in new era and forever changing cultural landscape of ancient world. Focus on themes of ancient kingship and political ideology; comparative study of empires; administration and institutions; and religious and ethnic diversity in large, heterogeneous states. Emphasis on diversity critical to understanding political nuances of ancient world. Students gain broad knowledge of Achaemenid and Macedonian empires, facility with ancient primary sources, and development of analytical skills central to discipline of history that

  • AN N EA 188SB - Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Instructor(s): Gina Konstantopoulos

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SA. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to finalize course syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • ARABIC 1B - Elementary Standard Arabic

    Instructor(s): Kinda Al RifaeGabriel Gluskin-braun

    Lecture, six hours. Enforced requisite: course 1A. Not open to students with prior knowledge of Arabic. Introduction to formal Arabic (modern standard Arabic), including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. P/NP or letter grading.

  • ARABIC 102B - Intermediate Standard Arabic

    Instructor(s): Abeer HamzaRory Macdonald

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 102A. Not open to students who have learned, from whatever source, enough Arabic to qualify for more advanced courses. Intermediate formal Arabic, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. P/NP or letter grading.

  • ARABIC 103B - Advanced Arabic

    Instructor(s): Abeer Hamza

    Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 102A, 102B, 102C. Not open to students who have learned, from whatever source, enough Arabic to qualify for more advanced courses. Advanced formal Arabic, including grammar, composition, and readings from classical and modern texts. P/NP or letter grading.

  • ARABIC 111B - Elementary Spoken Egyptian Arabic

    Instructor(s): Abeer Hamza

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 1C (or 8), 111A. Not suitable for heritage speakers. Introduction to spoken Arabic dialect of Egypt. Training in listening, speaking, and reading. P/NP or letter grading.

  • ARABIC 142 - Arabic Media

    Instructor(s): Michael Cooperson

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 103A. Development of facility with language of Arabic press and broadcasting. Activities include monitoring current materials via Internet; transcribing, translating, and summarizing; writing original reports in Arabic; and oral presentations and discussions. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • ARABIC 150 - Classical Arabic Literature in English

    Instructor(s): Michael Cooperson

    Lecture, three hours. Readings in English; knowledge of Arabic not required. Survey of premodern Arabic cultural production in its political, religious, and social contexts. Coverage of pre-Islamic Arabia, rise of Islam, and major themes of Southwest Asian history, along with significant figures and moments in literature and culture of premodern period. Consideration of selected modern responses to Arabic tradition. P/NP or letter grading.

  • ARMENIA 101B - Elementary Modern Western Armenian

    Instructor(s): Hagop Kouloujian

    Lecture, five hours. Recommended requisite: course 101A. Students with knowledge of Armenian should contact instructor to determine appropriate enrollment level. Armenian grammar, conversation, and exercises. P/NP or letter grading.

  • ARMENIA 102B - Intermediate Modern Western Armenian

    Instructor(s): Hagop Kouloujian

    Lecture, five hours. Recommended requisite: course 1C. Students with knowledge of Eastern or Western Armenian (from elementary or high school) should contact instructor to determine appropriate enrollment level. Reading of selected texts, composition, and conversation. May be taken independently for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • ARMENIA 104B - Elementary Modern Eastern Armenian

    Instructor(s): Tereza Hovhannisyan

    Lecture, five hours. Recommended requisite: course 104A. Students with knowledge of Western Armenian should contact instructor to determine appropriate enrollment level. Designed for students with little or no prior knowledge of Eastern Armenian, official idiom of Republic of Armenia. Introduction to basics of grammar and conversation. P/NP or letter grading.

  • ARMENIA 105B - Intermediate Modern Eastern Armenian

    Instructor(s): Tereza Hovhannisyan

    Lecture, five hours. Recommended requisite: course 4C. Students with knowledge of Eastern or Western Armenian (from elementary or high school) should contact instructor to determine appropriate enrollment level. Continuing introduction to Armenian grammar, with greater attention to readings from short stories and simple newspaper articles and film viewing on video. Emphasis on improving students' self expression in idiom, both orally and in written form. May be taken independently for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • ARMENIA 171 - Variable Topics in Armenian Studies

    Instructor(s): Hagop Kouloujian

    Lecture, three hours. Examination of major issues in Armenian studies. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units with topic and/or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • HEBREW 1B - Elementary Hebrew

    Instructor(s): Sariel Birnbaum

    Lecture, four hours; laboratory, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 1A or Hebrew placement test. Not open to native speakers. Introduction to modern Hebrew, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. P/NP or letter grading.

  • HEBREW 102B - Intermediate Hebrew

    Instructor(s): Sariel Birnbaum

    Lecture, five hours. Enforced requisite: course 102A or Hebrew placement test. Not open to native speakers. Amplification of grammar; reading of texts from modern literature. P/NP or letter grading.

  • HEBREW 110B - Introduction to Biblical Hebrew: Readings of Biblical Prose Texts

    Instructor(s): Jeremy Smoak

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 110A. Continuation of course 110A. Readings of biblical prose texts. P/NP or letter grading.

  • IRANIAN 1B - Elementary Persian

    Instructor(s): Banafsheh PourzangiM Shayegan

    Lecture, six hours. Enforced requisite: course 1A. Not open to students with prior knowledge of Persian. P/NP or letter grading.

  • IRANIAN 20B - Accelerated Elementary Persian

    Instructor(s): Latifeh Hagigi

    Lecture, four hours; discussion two hours; laboratory, 30 minutes per day. Preparation: some knowledge of spoken Persian. Enforced requisite: course 20A. Intensive and thorough study of fundamental structure of Persian grammar; reading from a wide range of classical and modern poetry and prose compositions. P/NP or letter grading.

  • IRANIAN 102B - Intermediate Persian

    Instructor(s): Latifeh Hagigi

    Lecture, six hours. Requisite: course 102A. P/NP or letter grading.

  • IRANIAN 103B - Advanced Persian: Introduction to Classical Persian Prose

    Instructor(s): Domenico Ingenito

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 102C. Students who do exceptionally well in course 20C may be permitted to enroll with consent of instructor. May be taken independently for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • IRANIAN M105B - Bahá'í Faith in Iran: Survey of Bahá'í Scriptures and Thought

    Instructor(s): Nader Saiedi

    (Same as Religion M105B.) Lecture, three hours. Readings in English. Analysis of major writings by Báb, Bahá'u'lláh, and 'Abdu'l-Bahá. Emphasis on mystical and social principles. May be taken independently for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • IRANIAN M178 - Introduction to History and Culture of Iranian Jews

    Instructor(s): Nahid Pirnazar

    (Same as History M178 and Jewish Studies M178.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to political, intellectual, cultural, and socioeconomic status of Iranian Jews. Exploration of history of Iranian Jews from ancient period throughout history, with focus on post-Middle Ages to present time. Topics, studied from perspective of Iranian cultural and intellectual history, include identity and status, religious tolerance versus forced conversion, Iranian Jewish emancipation, and dynamic symbiosis between Iranian Jews and other Iranians. P/NP or letter grading.

  • IRANIAN M60W - Achaemenid Civilization and Empire of Alexander

    Instructor(s): Elizabeth VandykeJeffrey NewmanEmma PetersenHong Yu ChenM ShayeganElisabeth KochCrystal Melara

    (Same as Ancient Near East M60W and History M60W.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course M60. Survey of period from circa 600 to 300 BCE, rise and fall of Achaemenid Persia, first world empire of antiquity, which was ended by Alexander the Great, whose campaigns were as transformative as they were violent. Alexander connected ancient Mediterranean and Near East as never before, ushering in new era and forever changing cultural landscape of ancient world. Focus on themes of ancient kingship and political ideology; comparative study of empires; administration and institutions; and religious and ethnic diversity in large, heterogeneous states. Emphasis on diversity critical to understanding political nuances of ancient world. Students gain broad knowledge of Achaemenid and Macedonian empires, facility with ancient primary sources, and development of analytical skills central to discipline of his

  • IRANIAN 189HC - Honors Contracts

    Instructor(s): Domenico Ingenito

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to upper-division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • ISLM ST M111 - Introduction to Islamic Archaeology

    Instructor(s): Katherine Burke

    (Same as Art History M119C and Middle Eastern Studies M111.) Lecture, three hours. From earliest monuments of Islam in Arabia and Jerusalem to humble remains of small Egyptian port, broad focus on archaeological and standing remains in central Islamic lands (primarily Syria, Egypt, and Iraq), Turkey, Iran, North Africa, and Spain. Profound cultural transformations occurred from birth of Islam in 7th century to early Ottoman period in 16th and 17th centuries, which are traceable in material records. Assessment of effectiveness of tools afforded by historical archaeology to aid understanding of past societies. P/NP or letter grading.

  • ISLM ST M115 - Islam and Other Religions

    Instructor(s): Azeem MalikLuke YarbroughSaad ShaukatAlberto Diaz Ruvalcaba

    (Formerly numbered M50.) (Same as Religion M115.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Students gain familiarity with historical cases and modes of interaction between Muslims and non-Muslims in plural societies. Consideration of axis questions such as how does Qur'an reflect religious plurality; how does it situate Islam vis-à-vis its alternatives; what encounters did rapid expansion of Islam bring about in diverse societies; how did Islam and other religions change through debate, war, and exchange of ideas; what roles has political power played in conditioning interreligious interaction; how have conversion and hybridity affected what it means to be Muslim; what is different about interreligious interactions in secular states and societies; and how is past invoked to justify opinions and policies today. Investigation of these questions by conducting microstudies: close readings of sources through theoretical lens. P/NP or letter grading.

  • JEWISH M80 - Jewish American Experience through Music

    Instructor(s): Thomas HansloweMark Kligman

    (Same as Musicology M80.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. In synagogue and on stage, and from LP recordings to YouTube, Jews in America have varied musical experiences. Music of synagogue, celebrations at home, in community, and theater are all interesting developments of Jewish music. New Opportunities in entertainment industry brought new possibilities for Jews in popular music, rock, and film scores. Exploration of various examples of Jews responding and adapting to their American context and becoming American through music. Exploration of different music genres and contexts. Presentations by guest composers and performers. Letter grading.

  • JEWISH M150A - Hebrew Literature in English: Literary Traditions of Ancient Israel--Bible and Apocrypha

    Instructor(s): Jeremy Smoak

    (Same as Comparative Literature M101.) Lecture, three hours. Study of literary culture of ancient Israel through examination of principal compositional strategies of Hebrew Bible and Apocrypha (read in translation). May be taken independently for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • JEWISH M178 - Introduction to History and Culture of Iranian Jews

    Instructor(s): Nahid Pirnazar

    (Same as History M178 and Iranian M178.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to political, intellectual, cultural, and socioeconomic status of Iranian Jews. Exploration of history of Iranian Jews from ancient period throughout history, with focus on post-Middle Ages to present time. Topics, studied from perspective of Iranian cultural and intellectual history, include identity and status, religious tolerance versus forced conversion, Iranian Jewish emancipation, and dynamic symbiosis between Iranian Jews and other Iranians. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M E STD M111 - Introduction to Islamic Archaeology

    Instructor(s): Katherine Burke

    (Same as Art History M119C and Islamic Studies M111.) Lecture, three hours. From earliest monuments of Islam in Arabia and Jerusalem to humble remains of small Egyptian port, broad focus on archaeological and standing remains in central Islamic lands (primarily Syria, Egypt, and Iraq), Turkey, Iran, North Africa, and Spain. Profound cultural transformations occurred from birth of Islam in 7th century to early Ottoman period in 16th and 17th centuries, which are traceable in material records. Assessment of effectiveness of tools afforded by historical archaeology to aid understanding of past societies. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M E STD 177 - Variable Topics in Middle Eastern Studies

    Instructor(s): Rawia Hayik

    Lecture, three hours. Variable topics; consult Schedule of Classes for topics to be offered in specific term. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • SEMITIC 140B - Elementary Akkadian

    Instructor(s): Barbara Cifola

    Lecture, three hours. Elementary grammar and reading of texts in standard Babylonian.

  • TURKIC 101B - Elementary Turkish

    Instructor(s): Beyza Lorenz

    Lecture, five hours. Requisite: course 101A. Grammar, reading, conversation, and elementary composition drills. P/NP or letter grading.

  • TURKIC 102B - Advanced Turkish

    Instructor(s): Beyza Lorenz

    Lecture, five hours. Requisites: courses 101A, 101B, 101C. Continuing study of grammar, conversation, and composition. Readings in modern literature and social science texts. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.